Tag Archives: Deepwater Horizon’

BP banned from government contracts in U.S.

The Environmental Protection Agency took the action of barring the petroleum giant from doing any contractual bidness with the U.s. in light of the Big Oil company’s dismal record. You can read all about the EPA’s action right here.

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Gulg spill harmed small fish, studies indicate

The bad results of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico continue to unravel, as this article notes.

pEER: BP stalling to see election results

More than two years ago, a massive blowout from BP’s Deepwater Horizon fouled the Gulf of Mexico in one of the largest environmental disasters in U.S. history.  Yet, no federal charges have been brought against the oil giant.

Instead, federal prosecutors and industry lawyers continue to negotiate behind closed doors.  Many are starting to suspect that BP is running out the clock in hopes that a Romney victory will strengthen its hand.

That suspicion is supported by a sweetheart deal BP cut late in the Bush administration.  In March 2006, a major BP pipeline leak went undetected for days, spilling a quarter-million gallons of oil on the Alaskan tundra, making it the largest oil spill in the history of the North Slope. The spill occurred because BP ignored its own workers’ warnings by neglecting critical maintenance to cut costs (sound familiar?)

Rather than throw the book at this corporate rogue, federal prosecutors short-circuited ongoing investigations by announcing a settlement that was stupefying in its generosity:

  • BP agreed to one misdemeanor charge carrying three-year probation and a total of only $20 million in penalties.  This meant no felony charges would be pursued and there would be no future prosecutions. No BP executive faced any criminal liability, let alone jail time;
  • The fines were only a fraction of what was legally required; and
  • This settlement was part of a package in which the Bush Justice Department secured only $50 million in fines for the BP Texas refinery explosion in which 15 people died – a slap on the wrist for a big multi-national corporation and an insult to the memories of the workers who died.

PEER asked the Justice Department Inspector General to investigate this travesty but the IG refused.  Had Justice taken strong action against BP then, it might have deterred BP’s Deepwater catastrophe just months later.

Will history repeat itself?  Based on the scant and incomplete testing for the key system for preventing a repeat of the massive Gulf of Mexico blowout in the sensitive waters of theArctic, our government has already forgotten the lessons we were supposed to have learned from Deepwater Horizon, even as its oil sheens keep surfacing.

Help PEER combat these recurrences of official amnesia.

Isac churned up leftovers from the BP spill in Gulf of Mexico

The area that was among the hardest hit by the BP spill has led to Louisiana state wildlife officials announcing the emergency closing of some coastal waters to commercial fishing. It’s the gift that, you know, keeps on . . . Read more.

BP feared Gulf oil spill of 3.4 million gallons a day

That’s what company officials feared, according to the texts of e-mails analyzed by the NY Times and described in this article. So, when should we expect another big spill? Actually, the thousands upon thousands of small spills from American motor vehicles alone equals a helluva lot of spilled petroleum.

Lesons of the Deepwater Horizon disaster

Lesson No. 1: Stop drilling now and get used to living with much less petroleum. It’s coming and we’d better get used to it now. Here’s what the NY Times says about a fresh new report on the Gulf of Mexico spill.

Feds will (again) offer oil leases in the Gulf

In my estimation, this is a huge mistake on the part of the Obama administration. How are we going to wean ourselves off the dirty oil habitat if we just keep drilling for more? And how are we, as a society, going to change our daily transportation choices to walking, or bicycling, or bus riding when we keep making it easy to pull over at a service station/convenience store and “fill ‘er up?”