Category Archives: raping of land

Thumbing-your-nose-at-nature sprawl development

I found this roadside billboard in the sprawl-happy former sagebrush-dominated desert south and west of Boise, Idaho, a few months ago. It reminds me of the bumper-sticker slogan, “Cut down all the trees and name the streets after them.” Welcome to McMansion USA.

‘Future of Hunting’ conference set in Bismarck, N.D.

Often forgotten in confabs like this one is this: There will be no hunting if all the habitat is lost to sprawl, paving, roads, pollution, climate change, and more. There is no grand secret, but lost amid all the yelling about a president’s alleged taking of personal firearms and other right-wing lies is this: Saving habitat is key. And restoring lost habitat is also on the mark.

Idaho gets federal grant to inventory rare species

And, then, after the inventories are done and the data published in binders that will collect dust in some archival dungeon somewhere, F and G will go ahead and hawk licenses and tags for some of the same species, all in a bid to bring in more dollars for its budget. This story that reads like a news release tells the story of the federal grant.

Conservancy, NY State acquire, protect key wetland complex near Lake Champlain

This is a big deal in an area of the lake’s watershed where developers continue to to destroy natural area after natural area, all in the name of “progress.”

Quote of the week

“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature—the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter.”

Rachel Carson, The Sense of Wonder

Sequoia smog harming pines, redwoods

More evidence of the harm to our natural heritage caused by human activities. So what is more important? That a polluting factory or gunk-emitting tanker truck be allowed to keep on moving? Or the native flora and fauna of North America? Well?

The car vs. wild America

Today’s five-mile exercise walk yielded sightings of the usual road-killed wildlife: squirrels, American robins, skunk, raccoon, opossum, white-tailed deer, monarch butterfly, orang sulphur butterfly, etc. etc. Meanwhile, the American love-affair with the almighty motor vehicle marches on, and on, an on . . .