Category Archives: hunting

‘Future of Hunting’ conference set in Bismarck, N.D.

Often forgotten in confabs like this one is this: There will be no hunting if all the habitat is lost to sprawl, paving, roads, pollution, climate change, and more. There is no grand secret, but lost amid all the yelling about a president’s alleged taking of personal firearms and other right-wing lies is this: Saving habitat is key. And restoring lost habitat is also on the mark.

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Conservation could save sage grouce and ranchers from ESA listing

Well, gosh, just what is the chief problem that’s driving the Sage Grouse into potential Endangered Species Act listing? Duh?

Give everyone, not just license buyers, a chance to fund conservation

That’s the theme of my latest newspaper column. You can read it here.

Idaho gets federal grant to inventory rare species

And, then, after the inventories are done and the data published in binders that will collect dust in some archival dungeon somewhere, F and G will go ahead and hawk licenses and tags for some of the same species, all in a bid to bring in more dollars for its budget. This story that reads like a news release tells the story of the federal grant.

Montana burg faces the urban deer quandry

This dilemma has faced city after city and town after town and, for the most part, continues to worsen. I recall visiting the Fontenelle Forest on the edge of Omaha, Neb., two decades ago and pondering the freakish park-like appearance of the forest atop a bluff overlooking the Missouri River. There was no understory. And the presence of a big herd of white-tailed deer was the reason. The people who look after the non-profit Fontenelle finally wised up and began conducting controlled hunts to get at least some of the deer out and give the forest and its understory a chance at growing – again. Spring forward to today and Missoula, Mont., faces the same problem as this article explains.

Keep the ‘hunt’ in hunting

Here is a must-read for everyone who knows the folly and stupidity and anti-conservation nonsense that accompanies the world of “canned” hunts (and road-hunting and a whole lot more).

Canned hunting: Don’t call it fair-chase anything

Because it isn’t. Plain and simple. It’s a crying shame, while I’m on the subject of hunting, that many state agencies like the Pennsylvania Game Commission derive nearly all of their budget money from the sale of hunting and trapping licenses. What does that tell the other citizens of that state who chose not to hunt, trap and fish for keepers? Do they also have a seat at the table?