Category Archives: fossil fuels

Quote of the week

World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General Michel Jarraud said the 350 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere since 1750 “will remain there for centuries, causing our planet to warm further and impacting on all aspects of life on earth.”

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Global disaster? Climate change not on today’s media agenda

According to the National Climatic Data Center, July 211 to June 2012 was the hottest 12-month stretch on human record. But even as the devastation resulting from humanity’s ongoing alteration of the Earth’s atmosphere became more and more obvious, coverage of the 2012 presidential election campaign seemed completely impervious to the effects of climate change,”the media watchdog organization FAIR reported. You can read about FAIR’s findings right here. The conservation impact of what we humans are doing to our fish and wildlife heritage by burning fossil fuels goes well beyond the crisis faced by one or two species.

How climate change may have worsened U.S. drought

There is little surprise in this, at least to people who are well-read on the science fo climate change. In any case, this article explores what apparently worsened the drought.

Coal reality: Time to face facts

And one of those facts we need to stop ignoring is this: It is past time – way past time – for us to stop burning the dirty rock called coal. We are both ruining our planet’s atmosphere and ruining the landscape called America by mining and then burning coal. The West Virginia Gazette offers this editorial.

James Hansen: ‘Neither party wants to offend the fossil fuel industry’

From Climate Progress comes this piece about NASA’s Dr. James Hansen. In it, Hansen talks about why scientists (and he is a model) must speak out about the threat posed by the burning of fossil fuels.

New gas-mileage standards saving oil, cutting emissions?

Higher fuel efficiency standards will cut oil use and greenhouse gas emissions. That’s the gist of this article. But it is what is beneath the headline that really makes a difference  as far as the health and well-being of fish and wildlife populations: The presence of roads and their fragmenting effect on the landscape everywhere. How about we start shutting some roads and restoring some migratory corridors and making protected areas “whole” again in the process.

A tax on carbon

Well, yes, because the time is right and doing so would also have spinoff economic effects.